Fire Department

Fire Prevention Week October 7-13 2018

As Fire Prevention Week approaches, the Jefferson City Fire Department encourages residents to “Look. Listen. Learn.” What does that mean?

October 5, 2018 – Today’s home fires burn faster than ever. In a typical home fire, you may have as little as one to two minutes to escape safely from the time the smoke alarm sounds. Knowing how to use that time wisely takes planning and practice. 

The Jefferson City Fire Department is teaming up with the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) ­�€‘�€‘ the official sponsor of Fire Prevention Week™ for more than 90 years �€‘�€‘ to promote this year’s Fire Prevention Week campaign, “Look. Listen. Learn. Be aware. Fire can happen anywhere™,” which works to educate the public about basic but essential ways to quickly and safely escape a home fire.

NFPA statistics show that the number of U.S. home fires has been steadily declining over the past few decades. However, the death rate per 1000 home fires that are reported to fire departments was 10 percent higher in 2016 than in 1980.

“These numbers show that while we’ve made significant progress in teaching people how to prevent fires from happening, there’s still much more work to do in terms of educating the public about how to protect themselves in the event of one,” said Lorraine Carli, NFPA’s vice president of Outreach and Advocacy. “This is particularly critical given the increased speed at which today’s home fires grow and spread.” 

Carli also notes that although people feel safest in their home, it is also the place people are at greatest risk to fire, with four out of five U.S. fire deaths occurring at home. That over-confidence contributes to a complacency toward home escape planning and practice.

“Working in the fire service for many years, we know that people often make choices in fire situations that jeopardize their safety or even cost them their lives,” said Jason Turner Division Chief of the Jefferson City Fire Department. “We need to do a better job of teaching people about the potentially life-saving difference escape planning and practice can make and motivating them to action.”

Division Chief Turner says this year’s “Look. Listen. Learn.” campaign highlights three steps people can take to help quickly and safely escape a fire: 

  • Look for places fire could start.
  • Listen for the sound of the smoke alarm.
  • Learn 2 ways out of every room. 

While NFPA and the J Fire Department are focusing on home fires, these fire safety messages apply to virtually anywhere. 

“Situational awareness is a skill people need to use wherever they go,” said Division Chief Turner “No matter where you are, look for available exits. If the alarm system sounds, take it seriously and exit the building immediately.” 

The Jefferson City Fire Department is hosting a series of events in support of this year’s Fire Prevention Week campaign, “Look. Listen. Learn.,” including the annual Lowes partnership where Lowes employee’s and JCFD firefighters visit neighborhoods to install smoke, CO Alarms and replacing batteries.






Open
Burning

As a reminder, Opening burning of yard waste inside the City Limits is allowed from November 1 thru March 1 during the day light hours only.


Our Purpose


To contribute to the overall quality of life by promoting a safe community through fire prevention and emergency response.

West Elm Fire

What We Do

The services provided by the fire department include: fire suppression, emergency medical services, rescue, hazardous materials mitigation, and overall management of emergencies. The department delivers emergency services from five fire stations strategically located within the city limits. Fire suppression services are rendered from seven fire trucks and one command vehicle. The frontline fleet includes three engines, two rescue pumpers, and two 100-foot ladder trucks. All frontline fire trucks are equipped with thermal imaging cameras, automated external defibrillators (AEDs), and carbon monoxide detectors. The fire department also maintains a reserve fleet of vehicles that are utilized when frontline trucks are out of service.  The reserve trucks include two engines, one rescue pumper, and one 75-foot ladder truck which are also used during callback procedures in the event of a large fire. 

The fire department also conducts fire safety inspections of all city businesses on an annual basis. Six fire personnel serve as special inspectors that oversee plan review, inspect high hazard locations, and perform new business inspections.  In 2014, the fire department and the city’s IT department developed a new software system to assist the department in tracking fire inspections and verifying business addresses.

Firefighters provide a variety of fire safety programs that include: workplace fire extinguisher training, a simulated fire trailer, and the education of children on the importance of fire safety and exit plans. Each fire station also has multiple firefighters that are certified child passenger safety seat installation technicians.

All fire personnel are state-licensed emergency medical technicians or paramedics and many are trained to perform specialized services including high angle and water rescue, trench collapse, automobile extrication, confined space and structural collapse operations.

Contact Information
Fire Administration
Open Monday through Friday 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
Phone: (573) 634-6401
Fax: (573) 634-6402